Bibliography, Acknowledgments, Credits, Sources, About the Author, Back Cover [Chapter 11]

Return to Nicholas Johnson’s Main Web Page

Return to Test Pattern for Living Contents Page 

Test Pattern for Living

Nicholas Johnson

Bibliography, Acknowledgments, Credits, Sources,

About the Author, Back Cover [Chapter 11].

[Note: Please see the 1996 Preface for an explanation of the unusual pagination.]

Copyright Notice: Copyright © 1972 by Bantam Books, Inc.; Copyright © 1996 by Nicholas Johnson.  All rights reserved.  This book may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any medium known now or in the future.  Provided, however, that permission is hereby granted to distribute this book under the following conditions:  (1) that it is distributed in its entirety, including this copyright notice and 1996 Preface, (2) that no charge is exacted, or revenue received, directly or indirectly, by anyone in connection with the transfer, and (3) as a matter of courtesy and information, that the author be informed, simultaneously with the distribution, of any distribution to more than one person or posting for availability on the Internet, Web, or publicly available directory.  Any other use requires the prior permission of the author:  Nicholas Johnson, njohnson@inav.net, postal:  Box 1876, Iowa City IA 52244-1876, U.S.A.

# p. 146 #

Bibliography [Chapter 11]

This is a selected list of books that have some relation to this one: they deal with similar theories, they influenced me at some point in my life, they were written by friends who have influenced me, they are useful “workbooks” of some sort, guides to our culture, or they were blowing in the intellectual and emotional wind at the time this book was being put together. Many have been omitted. The list includes virtually none of the books I use professionally, and I deliberately listed only paperbacks.

Joan Baez, Daybreak (Avon, 1969 [l966], 95¢).

Richard J. Barnet, The Economy of Death (Atheneum, 1969, $2.95).

The Bhagavad Gita (Penguin, 1962, 95¢).

Rollin and Marcha Binzer, Understanding Why You Are DisappointedA Little Alone A Little Afraid and Nothing Seems Right Anymore 
(The Communication Gap, 1971).

Ernest Callenbach, Living Poor with Style (Bantam, 1972, $1.95).

Carlos Casteneda, The Teachings of Don Juan: a Yaqui Way ofKnowledge (Ballantine, 1968, 95¢).

Paddy Chayefsky, The Latent Heterosexual (Bantam, 1967, 95¢).

Harry H. Clark (ed.), Thomas Paine: Selections (Hill and Wang, 
rev. ed., 1961, $2.45).

Eldridge Cleaver, Soul on Ice (Dell, 1968, 95¢).

Robert Coles and Jon Erikson, The Middle Americans 
(Atlantic-Little, Brown, 1971, $3.95).

The Constitution of the United States of America (Government 
Printing Office, 1968 [1789], 10¢).

Consumer Reports (P. O. Box 1000, Mt. Vernon, N.Y.; $8.00 a year, 
$6.00 for five or more subscriptions together).

Edward F. Cox, Robert C. Fellmeth, John E. Schulz, The NaderReport on the Federal Trade Commission (Grove Press, 1969, 
$1.25).

# p. 147 #

Tom Cuthbertson, Anybody’s Bike Book (Ten Speed Press, 1971, 
$3.00).

Adelle Davis, Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit (Signet, 1954, $1.50).

Erich Fromm, The Art of Loving (Bantam, 1956, 75¢).

John Kenneth Galbraith, The Affluent Society (Mentor, 1958, 75¢).

John W. Gardner, Self-Renewal (Harper, 1965 [1963], $1.45).

Dwight Goddard (ed.), A Buddhist Bible (Beacon, 1970 [1938], 
$3.95). 
  
Paul Goodman, Growing Up Absurd (Vintage, 1956, $1.95).

Soren Hansen and Jesper Jensen with Wallace Roberts, The LittleRed Schoolbook (Pocket Books, 1971 [1969], $1.25). 
  
John Hartford, Word Movies (Doubleday, 1971, $2.95). 
  
Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in a Strange Land (Berkeley, 1961, 
$1.25).

Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf (Bantam, 1969, $1.25). 
  
Wendell Johnson, Verbal Man (Collier, 1965 [1956], 95¢).

Jacqueline Killeen (ed.), Ecology at Home (101 Productions, 
1971, $1.95).

Yeffe Kimball and Jean Anderson, The Art of American IndianCooking (Avon, 1965, 95¢). 
  
Alicia Bay Laurel, Living on the Earth (Vintage, 1970, $3.95).

Alan Levy, William B. Chapman, Richard Saul Wurman, Our Man-MadeEnvironment Book Seven (MIT Press, 1970, $4.95). 
  
Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media (McGraw-Hi11, 1964, $1.95). 
  
Rollo May, Man’s Search for Himself (Signet, 1953, $1.25). 
  
Donella H. Meadows, Dennis L. Meadows, Jorgen Randers, William W. 
Behrens, The Limits to

# p. 148 #

Growth: A Report for the Club of Rome (Potomac Associates- 
Universe, 1972, $2.75).

Morton Mintz and Jerry S. Cohen, America, Inc. (Dell, 1972 
[1971], $1.50).

Robin Morgan (ed.), Sisterhood Is Powerful (Vintage, 1970, 
$2.45).

Helen and Scott Nearing, Living the Good Life (Schocken, 1954, 
1970, $2.25).

The New English Bible (Cambridge, 1971, $4.45).

The O. M. Collective, The Organizer’s Manual (Bantam, 1971, 
$1.25).

George Orwell, 1984 (Signet, 1949, 95¢).

Betty Ann Ottinger, What Every Woman Should Know — and Do — AboutPollution (Ep Press, 1970).

Vance Packard, The Waste Makers (Pocket Books, 1960, 95¢).

Linus Pauling, Vitamin C and the Common Cold (Bantam, 1971 
[1970], $1.25).

Eliot Porter, In Wildness Is the Preservation of the World 
(Sierra Club-Ballantine, 1962, $3.95).

Gerome Ragni and James Rado, HAIR (Pocket Books, 1966, 95¢).

Charles A. Reich, The Greening of America (Bantam, 1970, $1.95).

Kenneth Rexroth, One Hundred Poems from the Japanese (New 
Directions, 1964, $1.75).

Rainier Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet (Norton, rev. ed. 
1954 [l934], $1.25).

Robert H. Rimmer, The Harrad Experiment (Bantam, 1966, $1.25).

Robert Rodale (ed.), The Basic Book of Organic Gardening (Organic 
Gardening-Ballantine, 1971, $1.25).

Theodore Roszak, The Making of a Counter Culture (Anchor, 1968, 
$1.95).

Jerry Rubin, Do It! (Simon & Schuster, 1970, $1.25).

Swami Satchidananda, Integral Yoga Hatha (Holt, 1970, $4.95).

# p. 149 #

Michael Shamberg, Guerilla Television (Holt, 1971, $3.95).

Philip Slater, The Pursuit of Loneliness (Beacon, 1970, $2.45).

Song Hits Magazine (Division Street, Derby, Connecticut 
06418, $3.50 a year).

L. Clark Stevens, EST: The Steersman Handbook (Bantam, 1971, 
$1.50).

D. T. Suzuki, Studies in Zen (Delta, 1955, $1.85).

Paul Swatek, The User’s Guide to the Protection of theEnvironment (Friends of the Earth-Ballantine, 1970, $1.25).

Jay Thompson, I Am Also a You (Potter-Crown, 1971, $1.95).

Henry David Thoreau, Walden and On the Duty of Civil Disobedience 
(Collier, 1962 [1854, 1848], 65¢).

Alvin Toffler, Future Shock (Bantam, 1971, $1.95).

Sita Weiner, Swami Satchidananda (Bantam, 1972 [l970], $1.95).

The Last Whole Earth Catalog (Portola Institute-Random House, 
1971, $5.00).

Eliot Wigginton (ed.), The Foxfire Book (Anchor, 1972, $3.95).

Mason Williams, The Mason Williams FCC Rapport (Liveright, 1969, 
$2.95).

Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (Bantam, 1968, $1.25).

# p. 150 #

Acknowledgments

Television commercials are used throughout. There is no published compilation that can be cited. Most of those used here were obtained from advertising agency “story boards” on file with the Federal Trade Commission.

Page ii  Lawrence Ferlinghetti, “I Am Waiting,” A Coney Island of the Mind (1958) p. 49 / Howard Fast, Citizen Tom Paine (1943) pp. 30-31. 
 Page xx  Mason Williams, “Commercials,” The Mason Williams FCC Rapport (1969) p. 7. 
 Page 2  Rollo May, Love and Will (1969) p. 156 / Benjamin Spock, Decent and Indecent — Our Personal and Political Behavior (1969) p. 153 / Allen Ginsberg, quoted in I Seem To Be A Verb by R. Buckminster Fuller (1970) p. 165A / Archibald MacLeish, quoted in Due to Circumstances Beyond Our Control by Fred Friendly (1967) p. xxiv. 
 Page 3  Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (1968) Chapter 15 / David L. Lange, Robert K. Baker, Sandra J. Ball, Violence and the Media: A Staff Report to the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence (1969), vols. 9, 9A / Senator J. W. Fulbright, The Pentagon Propaganda Machine (1970). 
 Page 4  Andrew Fletcher, Conversation Concerning a Right Regulation of Government for the Common Good of Mankind (1703) / William F. Fore, Image and Impact (1970) p. 40 / Walter Lippmann, Public Opinion (1922) pp. 275-76. 
 Page 5  “Who’s Afraid of Big Bad T.V.?” Time (November 23, 1970) p. 60ff / “The Selling of the Candidates, 1970,” Newsweek (November 19, 1970), p. 30ff / Robin Morgan, quoted in “Is Television Making a Mockery of the American Woman?” by Edith Efron, TV Guide (August 8, 1970) p. 6. 
 Page 6  Aurelio Peccei, “Problems of World Future,” in Technology Forecasting (1970) pp. 229-33 / A Consumer Products Survey / Erich Fromm, The Revolution of Hope (1968) p. 153. 
 Page 7  The New York Times (July 13, 1970) p. 1 / U.S. Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States (1970) p. 712. 
 Page 8  Dr. William Glasser, “Youth in Rebellion — Why?” U.S. News and World Report (April 27, 1970) p. 42 / Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., “Velocity of History,” Newsweek (July 6, 1970) p. 33 / The Mothers of Invention, “Hungry Freaks, Daddy,” (1967) / Rollo May, Man’s Search for Himself (1953) p. 22. 
 Page 9  U.S. Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States (1970) p. 50 / U.S. Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States (1970) p. 154 / “The American Family: Future Uncertain,” Time (December 28, 1970) p. 34 / Joint Commission on Mental Health of Children, Suicide Among Youth (1969) / The Movement Toward a New America, edited by M. Goodman (1970) p. 101 / The New York Times Encyclopedic Almanac (1971) p. 500. 
 Page 10  Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf (1929) p. 200 / Arnold S. Kaufman, The Radical Liberal New Man in American Politics (1968) p. 26 / R. D. Laing, The Politics of Experience (1967) pp. 25-26. 
 Page 12  Erich Fromm, The Sane Society (1955) p. 15 / Charles Manson, quoted in Time (November 30, 1970) p. 45 / Harvey Cox, The Secular City (1966, rev. ed.) p. 133 / Paul Goodman, Growing Up Absurd (1960) pp. 13-14. 
 Page 14  Ray Walczack, quoted in “The Troubled American: A Special Report of the White Majority,” Newsweek (October 9, 1969) p. 57 / Joe South, “Don’t It Make You Wanna Go Home?” (1969). 
 Page 16  Lawrence Ferlinghetti, “The World is a Beautiful Place . . .,” A Coney Island of the Mind (1958) p. 88 / Marshall McLuhan, “Great Change-Overs for You,” Problems and Controversies in Television and Radio, edited by H. T. Skornia and J. Kitson (1968) pp. 31-32 / Y. Yevtushenko, “Talk,” Selected Poems (1962) p. 81. 
 Page 18  John V. Lindsay, Address at the University of California at Berkeley (April 2, 1970) / Richard J. Barnet, Economy of Death (1969) pp. 6-7. / Abraham Lincoln, Address, March 4, 1861, Inaugural Addresses of Presidents of the United States, U.S. Government Printing Office (1969) p. 125 / Milton Friedman, “The Social Responsibility of Business Is to Increase Its Profits,” The New York Times Magazine

# p. 151 #

(September 13, 1970) p.33 / Thomas C. Raymond, “The New Business Student,” Newsweek (October 12, 1970) p. 76. 
 Page 20  E. Foote, Statement before the World Conference on Smoking and Health quoted in To Seek a Newer World by Robert Kennedy (1968) p.6 / Alexander Kendrick, Prime Time (1969) p. 34 / Barry M. Goldwater, quoted in “The Politics of Ecology,” by Wheeler, Saturday Review (March 7, 1970) p. 52 / Paddy Chayefsky, The Latent Heterosexual (1967) p. 105 / Richard J. Barnet, The Economy of Death (1969) p. 152. 
 Page 21   Nicholas Johnson, “Stewardess” (1972). 
 Page 22  Country Joe McDonald. “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixing-To-Die-Rag,” (1968) / J. Brown, B. Byrd and R. Lenhoff, “Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved,” (1970) / Patrick Watson. Conspirators in Silence (1969) p. 59 / Erik Barnouw, The Image Empire (1970) p. 343. 
 Page 24  William F. Fore, Image and Impact (1970) pp. 45-46 / Philip Slater, The Pursuit of Loneliness (1970) p. 14. 
 Page 26  Timothy J. Cooney and James Haughton, It’s up to You: A Guide to Changing the System (1971) pp. 97-98. 
 Page 28  David Riesman, Abundance for What?  And Other Essays (1964) p. 180 / Spiro T. Agnew, “Another Challenge to the Television Industry,” TV Guide (May 16, 1970) p. 8 / Suzannah Lessard, “America’s Traps: The Youth Cult, The Work Prison, The Emptiness of Age,” The Washington Monthly (February, 1971) p. 31 / Mason Williams, Flavors (1970). 
 Page 30  Mason Williams, The Mason Williams Reading Matter (1969) / Paul Swatek, The User’s Guide in the Protection of the Environment (1970) p. 9. 
 Page 32  Richard M. Nixon, quoted in The Washington Post (November 12, 1969) p. B15 / George F. Kennan, “Con III Is Not the Answer,” The New York Times (November 28, 1970) p. 43 / Robert L. Shayon, “T.V. and Radio:  Father Television Knows Best,” Saturday Review (December 5, 1964) p. 42 / Melanie Safka, “What Have They Done to My Song, Ma,” (1970). 
 Page 34  Jerry Rubin, Do It! (1970) p. 87 / Gene Maclellan, “Put Your Hand in the Hand,” (1970) / Warren Magnuson, The Television Inquiry Senate Committee on Commerce, 89th Congress, 2nd Session, Senate No. 2769, From Letter of Transmittal to Federal Communications Commission iv (1956). 
 Page 36  James Kunen, The Strawberry Statement (1970) p. 79 / Walter Cronkite, quoted in “Television:  The Most Intimate Medium,” Time (October 14, 1966) p. 57 / Frank N. Stanton and Paul F. Lazarsfeld, Introduction to Communication Research (1949) p. xii / David Sarnoff, Looking Ahead (1968) pp. 39-40 / William Benton, “Television With a Conscience,” Saturday Review (August 25, 1951) p. 7. 
 Page 38  E. B. White, Letter from E. B. White to the Carnegie Commission on Educational Television, Public Television, A Program for Action (1967) p. 13 / Walter Lippmann, quoted in Due to Circumstances Beyond Our Control, by Fred Friendly (1967) p. 116 / Mason Williams, The Mason Williams FCC Rapport (1969) p. 136 / Richard M. Nixon, remarks at White House Bi-Partisan Leadership Meeting (October 23, 1969) / George Clayton Johnson, “An Open Letter to CBS,” Los Angeles Free Press (May 15, 1970). 
 Page 40  Tim Buckley, “Goodbye and Hello,” (1968) / Erik Barnouw, The Image Empire (1970) p.33. 
 Page 42  William F. Fore, Image and Impact (1970) p. 40. 
 Page 44  Rice, “The Biography of A Play,” Theatre Arts (November, 1969) / William F. Fore, Image and Impact (1970) pp. 48-49 / Eve Merriam, “On Teevee,” The Inner City Mother Goose (1969) p. 79. 
 Page 46  Robert H. Finch, Address to the Television Bureau of Advertising, 15th Annual Meeting (October 21, 1969) / Clyde Miller, quoted in The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard (1957) pp. 158-59 / William F. Fore, Image and Impact (1970) p. 17 / Wilbur Schramm, quoted in Television in the Lives of Our Children, edited by Q. Schramm, E. Parker, and J. Lyle (1961) p. 58. 
 Page 48  Marian Delgado, Remarks at CBS Annual Meeting of Shareholders, San Francisco (April 15, 1970) / Donna Keck, “The Art of Maiming Women,” Women, a Journal of Liberation (Fall, 1969) p. 42. 
 Page 50  Robin Morgan, quoted in “Is Television Making a Mockery of the American Woman?” by Edith Efron, TV Guide (August 8, 1970) p. 8 / Norman Mark, “TV”s Sexual Guard Isn’t Very Avant,” Chicago

# p. 152 #

Daily News (Panorama, July 18-19, 1970) p. 19 / Dr. Mary S. Calderone, “Sex and the Communicative Arts,” speech delivered to Seventeen magazine’s major advertisers, “Seventeen’s Think Young Think Tank,” New York (September 11, 1969) / Rollo May, Man’s Search for Himself (1953) p. 145. 
 Page 51  Nicholas Johnson, “Sex” (1972). 
 Page 52  Larry Niven, “Death by Ecstasy,” The World’s Best Science Fiction, edited by D. Wollheim and T. Carr (1970) pp. 50-51 / Mick Jagger and Keith Richard, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” (1962). 
 Page 54  R. Buckminster Fuller, quoted in “Open Land,” by S. Davidson, Harper’s (June, 1970) p. 100 / Joni Mitchell, “Woodstock,” (1969) / Glenn Yarbrough, quoted in “Singer Chucks Fame, Wealth for Simple Life,” by D. Lamb, Los Angeles Times (February 21, 1971) p. 1 / Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854, Collier 1962) p. 74. 
 Page 56  Helen and Scott Nearing, Living the Good Life (1970) p. 186. 
 Page 58  Alicia Bay Laurel, Living on the Earth (1970) Introduction / Roger J. Williams, “The Biology of Behavior,” Saturday Review (January 30, 1971) / Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854, Collier 1962) p. 106. 
 Page 60  R. Self, “What Every Little Boy Ought to Know,” (1970) / Mason Williams, The Mason Williams FCC Rapport (1969) p. 95 / W. H. Auden, “Forgotten Laughter, Forgotten Prayer,” The New York Times (February 2, 1971) p. 37. 
 Page 62  Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet (rev. ed. 1954) p. 19 / Margaret Lewis and Mira Smith, “Oh, Singer,” (1971) / Rollo May, Man’s Search for Himself (1953) p. 137 / Bhagavad Gita, 2:71. 
 Page 64  Mac Davis, “Everything a Man Could Ever Need,” (1969, 1970) / Holderlin, The Movement Toward a New America, edited by Mitchell Goodman (1970) p. 25 / Roger J. Williams, “The Biology of Behavior,” Saturday Review (January 30, 1971) p. 17 / Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet (rev. ed. 1954) pp. 53-54 / Betty Craig, “Money Can’t Buy Love,” (1970). 
 Page 66  Staughton Lynd, “Again — Don’t Tread On Me,” Newsweek (July 6, 1970) p. 31 / James A. Michener, The Quality of Life (1970) p. 116 / Edward A. Sapir, “Culture, Genuine and Spurious,” Selected Writings of Edward Sapir, edited by David Mandelbaum (1949) p. 323. 
 Page 68  Ou Yang Hsiu, “Reading the Poem of An Absent Friend,” One Hundred Poems From the Chinese, edited by Kenneth Rexroth (1965) pp. 57, 58 / Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf (1963) p. 144 / Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Illusions,” The Portable Emerson, edited by M. Van Doren (1969) pp. 234-35 / Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854, Collier 1962) p. 22 / The Book of Tao 29, D. Goddard, ed., A Buddhist Bible (1938) p. 418. 
 Page 70  Edward A. Sapir, “Culture, Genuine and Spurious,” Selected Writings of Edward Sapir, edited by David Mandelbaum (1949) p. 316 / Sara Davidson, “Open Land,” Harper’s (June, 1970) p. 100 / Erich Fromm, Revolution of Hope (1968) p. 1 / Edmund Carpenter, “Art As Act,” They Became What They Beheld (1970) unpaged. 
 Pages 72, 74, 76  Art Buchwald, “The Great TV Blackout,” The Washington Post (February 16, 1971) p. C-1. 
 Page 76  Edmund Carpenter.  “Art As Act,” They Become What They Beheld (1970) unpaged / Former United Air Lines labor relations executive, quoted in “The Great Escape — Leaving the Security of a Corporate Payroll,” by John Koehne.  Wall Street Journal (February 22, 1971) p. 1. 
 Page 78  Bobby Bond, “Back to Where It’s At,” / Ann-Elizabeth, “The Experiment,” The Magic Book of Love Exercises (1971) p. 29 / Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Illusions,” The Portable Emerson, edited by M. Van Doren (1969) p. 27. 
 Page 80  John Hartford, “Baking Soda,” Word Movies (1971) p. 42 / Paul Swatek,The User’s Guide to the Protection of the Environment (1970) p. 93. 
 Page 82  John Prine,  “Spanish Pipe Dream,” (1971). 
 Page 84  Philip Slater, The Pursuit of Loneliness (1970) p. 93. 
 Page 86  Adelle Davis, Let’s Eat Right to Keep Fit (1970) p. 63 / Dr. George A. Sheehan, quoted in article in Chicago Tribune by Robert Lipsyte. 
 Page 88  Adelle Davis, Let’s Eat Right To Keep Fit (1970) p. 16.

# p. 153 #

Page 90  Walter Sullivan, “Meteor Findings Back Theory on Life,” The New York Times (June 19, 1971) p. 28 / Robert Choate, “Television Ads Aimed at Children Stir Ire of Parents, Critics,” The Wall Street Journal (October 22, 1970) p. 1. 
 Page 92  “Pauling Asserts Large Doses of Vitamin C Can Prevent Colds,” The New York Times (November 19, 1970). 
 Page 94  Marcia Cavell, “Visions of a New Religion,” Saturday Review (December 19, 1970) p. 12 / Joan Baez, Daybreak (1968) pp. 137-38 / John Koehne, “The Great Escape — Leaving the Security of the Corporate Payroll,” The Wall Street Journal (February 22, 1971) p. 1. 
 Page 96  Nobutane Kiuchi, “Japan Will Have to Slow Down,” Fortune (February, 1971) p. 98 / Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet (1954, rev. ed.) p. 30 / Walter McQuade, “High Style Disrupts the Men’s Wear Industry,” Fortune (February, 1971) p. 70. 
 Page 98  Bernadine Morris, “Beachwear? Streetwear?  It’s All Starting to Look the Same,” The New York Times (June 19, 1971) p. C 14 / Karl Fleming, “The Square American Speaks Out,” Newsweek (October 6, 1969) p. 50 / E. B. White, “Commuter,” The Lady Is Cold (1925). 
 Page 100  Jules Henry, Culture Against Man (1963) p. 95 / Philip Slater, “The Pursuit of Loneliness,” Psychology Today (July, 1970) / John Hartford, “The Good Old Electric Washing Machine Circa 1943,” Word Movies (1971) pp. 117-18. 
 Page 102  Garrett DeBell, “Energy,” The Environmental Handbook (1970) pp. 66-67 / Paul Swatek, The User’s Guide to the Protection of the Environment (1970) p. 39. 
 Page 104  Betty Ann Ottinger, What Every Woman Should Know and Do About Pollution (1970) pp. 66-67 / Joni Mitchell, “Big Yellow Taxi,” (1970) / Betty Ann Ottinger, What Every Woman Should Know and Do About Pollution (1970) pp. 59-60 / Bill Scudder, quoted in “The Troubled American: A Report on the White Majority,” Newsweek (October 6, 1969) p. 59. 
 Page 106  L. Clark Stevens, EST (1970) pp. 132-33 / John Holt, “School Is Bad for Children,” Saturday Evening Post (February 8, 1969) p. 269 / G. Ragni and J. Rado, Hair (1969) p. 86 / Aaron Copland.  What to Listen for in Music (1957) p. 24. 
 Page 108  Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in a Strange Land (1961) p. 382 / Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet (1954, rev. ed.) p. 74. 
 Page 110  C. E. Warne, “No Time to Live,” address before Unitarian Forum, Kansas City, Mo. (October 7, 1951) / R. Buckminster Fuller, Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1969) pp. 129-30 / MG advertisement in Time (March 6, 1970) p. 6. 
 Page 112  Paul Swatek, The User’s Guide to the Protection of the Environment (1970) pp. 285-86 / Edward T. Hall, quoted in The Environmental Handbook, edited by G. DeBell (1970) p. 199. 
 Page 114  Paul Swatek, The User’s Guide to the Protection of the Environment (1970) pp. 253, 285-86. 
 Page 116  Thomas R. Reid III, “Easy Rider:  A Solution to the Commuter Crisis,” Vol. 116 Congressional Record p. 55868 (April 16, 1970) / Friends of the Earth, “National Bike Week,” Man Apart (April, 1972) p. 3. 
 Page 118  Rollo May, Man’s Search for Himself (1953) p. 42 / John Gardner, The Recovery of Confidence (1970) p. 77 / Louis B. Lundborg, “The Lessons of Isla Vista,” speech to Seattle Rotary Club (June 17, 1970). 
 Page 120  Seymour Melman, Our Depleted Society (1965) p. 128 / A welder and Willie Sanders, quoted in “The Square American Speaks Out,” by Karl Fleming, Newsweek (October 6, 1969) p. 50. 
 Page 122  Erich Fromm, Revolution of Hope (1968) p. 125. 
 Page 124  David Broder, Parade (February 15, 1970) p. 23 / Former New York stockbroker and former insurance man, quoted in “The Great Escape — Leaving the Security of the Corporate Payroll Isn’t Easy,” by John Koehne, Wall Street Journal (February 22, 1971) p. 1. 
 Page 126  Former corporate engineer, quoted in “The Great Escape — Leaving the Security of a Corporate Payroll Isn’t Easy,” by John Koehne, Wall Street Journal (February 22, 1971) p. 1 / Taylor Branch, “Courage Without Esteem:  Profiles in Whistle Blowing,” Washington Monthly (May, 1971) p. 36.

# p. 154 #

Page 128  Suzannah Lessard, “America”s Trap:  The Youth Cult, The Work Prison, The Emptiness of Age,” The Washington Monthly (February, 1971) p. 30 / Archibald MacLeish, “Speech To A Crowd,” The Collected Poems of Archibald MacLeish (1962) p. 115 / Elie Wiesel, “To a Young Rebel,” The Washington Post (February 18, 1971) p. C 1. 
 Page 130  Charles A. Reich, The Greening of America (1970) pp. 429, 430 / Howard Zinn, “The Radicals:  Time Out to Retrench,” Time (February 22, 1971) p. 10. 
 Page 132  Jerry Edmonton, John Day and Nick St. Nicholas, “Monster,” (1970) / Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, “New World Coming,” (1970). 
 Page 133  The New York Times (December 26, 1970) p. 14 / “The American Family: Future Uncertain,” Time (December 28, 1970) p. 27 / Source Coalition, Washington, D.C., Source Catalogue Communications, 1971 / U.S.Public Health Service. 
 Page 134  Gil Scott-Heron, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” (1970) / William O. Douglas, Points of Rebellion, p. 96 / Martin Luther King, Jr., quoted in “The Radicals: Time Out To Retrench,” by J. Bernbaum, Time (February 22, 1971) p. 10. 
 Page 135  The Singer Sewing Machine Company / Everybody’s Money (Winter 1970-71) p. 12 / U.S.Public Health Service. 
 Page 136  A gas station attendant, quoted in “The Average Man Might Fool You,” by Robert Coles, Life (May 7, 1971) p. 4 / Fred Harris, David Frost Show broadcast in Washington, D.C., WTTG-TV (July 17, 1970) / A policeman, quoted in “The Average Man Might Fool You,” by Robert Coles, Life (May 7, 1971) p. 4 / Edward M. Kennedy, Decisions for a Decade (1968). 
 Page 138  Melanie Safka, “Nickel Song,” (1970) / Mayer Vishner, “Editor’s Afterword:  The Role of Rock,”  1971 Peace Calendar (1970) / Paul Goodman, The New York Times (September 2, 1970) p. 32 / Red Lane, Larry Henley, and Johnny Slate, “The World Needs a Melody,” (1971). 
 Page 140  Louis B. Lundborg, “The Lessons of Isla Vista,” speech to Seattle Rotary Club (June 17, 1970) / Edward H. Meyer, “Grey Matter,” Consumer Reports (November, 1970). 
 Page 142  Stanley Cohen, quoted in “Advertising on the Defensive in the Age of Disbelief,” by Coleman McCarthy, The Washington Post (November 8, 1970) p. B 3.

Credits

During 1970-72 a number of persons in my family, the Bantam family, my office, and elsewhere assisted in a variety of ways to bring me, and this book, into being. They know who they are, and what they did. Some are listed here — alphabetically by first names — as a token of my appreciation, debt, or love, as the case my be.

Al, Andi, Andy, Angela, Anne, Bob, Bonnie, Candy, Carlos, Carol, Catherine, Charles, Cheri, Chet, Chris, Craig, Debbie, Denny, Don, Donna, Doris, Ed, Edna, Elaine, Elizabeth, Esther, Evie, Florrie, Fran, Fred, Gary, Gilson, Gregory, Hank, Hans, Harriet, Hildegard, Jack, Jane, Jean, Jeff, Jeneen, Jenny, Jerry, Jim, Joe, Judy, Julie, Karen, Katy, Lee, Leni, Linda, Liz, Lucy, Marc, Margo, Marlene, Marv, Mary Ann, Mason, Max, Mel, Meredith, Michael, Pat, Peggy, Phil, Ralph, Rich, Sam, Sharon, Sherman, Stephan, Stephanie, Susan, Thorper, Tom, Toni, Tracy, Vic, Willa, Wretha.

# p. 155 #

Sources

Some of the ideas contained in this book were first presented in the Pauly Ballroom, University of California, Berkeley, November 7, 1970, as the annual Barbara Weinstock Lecture on the Morals of the Trade. The text of that speech was published in a limited edition by the University of California as Life Before Death in the Corporate State (1971).

The speech was recorded for broadcast, and is available to radio stations from the Pacifica Tape Library (2217 Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley, California 94704 [no. AP1369]).

Ten brief excerpts were distributed to radio stations by American Report (Clergy and Laymen Concerned, P.O. Box 6676, Washington, D.C. 20009) as its May 8-20, 1972 biweekly, recorded distribution of daily programs.

Elektra Records plans to release an LP based upon the speech entitled “Test Pattern for Living.”

Some of the ideas come from a speech presented as a Poynter Fellow Lecture at Yale University on March 8, 1971 under the title, “The Careening of America.”

A third public performance, at Grinnell College on April 1, 1971, was televised by the Iowa Educational Broadcasting Network on April 12, 1971 under the title “How to Survive in a Corporate Society.”

The title “Test Pattern for Living” was first used in an article published in the Saturday Review, May 29, 1971, pages 12-15 and 33.

That article was recorded for the blind and distributed by Choice Magazine Listening (125 Main Street, Port Washington, New York 10050), Issue 57, Sides 1 and 2, September 1971.

Other material is drawn from “The Life Party,” The New Republic, April 10, 1971, pages 21-23, and a commencement address at Windham College, “Working in a Corporate State,” May 23, 1971.

Although the author has received no payment for any presentation of this material, and will receive no royalties from this book, he wishes to express his appreciation to those who have provided the prior occasions to prepare it, who have taken an interest in its distribution, and who have granted such permissions as were necessary on this occasion.

# p. 156 #

About the Author

Nicholas Johnson was born in Iowa City in 1934, and earned B.A. and LL.B. degrees from the University of Texas (Austin) where he was Phi Beta Kappa and a student editor of the Texas Law Review. He has served as a law clerk to Chief Judge John R. Brown of the U.S. Court of Appeals (5th Circuit) and to senior Associate Justice Hugo L. Black of the U.S. Supreme Court, and as a member of the law faculty at the University of California (Berkeley). He was an associate member of the Washington, D.C. law firm, Covington & Burling, when appointed U.S. Maritime Administrator by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964. His seven-year term as an FCC Commissioner began on July 1, 1966. One of the youngest men ever to hold these positions, he was selected by the U.S. Jaycees as one of the nation’s “Ten Outstanding Young Men” in 1967. He has written for many general and professional publications and is the author of How to Talk Back to Your Television Set.

# p. back cover #

How to talk back to your corporate state

[bubble] An essential combat manual and 
coping guide for survivors of the System. 
Created by America’s foremost Establishment guerrilla. . . 
Nicholas Johnson 
Federal Communications Commissioner 
and “the citizen’s least 
frightened friend in Washington!” 
–John Kenneth Galbraith

[bubble] with a lot of quotes from his friends. . .

[bubble]. . . brought to you by some 
of America’s finest 
corporations, which 
demand your valuable 
dollars in exchange 
for their cents of values

[bubble] “We ought to help 
each other. We damn 
sure aren’t getting any 
help from Big Business, 
Big Broadcasting, 
or Big Government!”

[Photo of Nicholas Johnson]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s